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    Faye, Mike and Melody Speck of Owasso sang during the Monday morning pastors'
    conference. Speck was later elected music director for the Conference ot Southern Bap-
    tist Evangelists. :-:'/.;: ".
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    BAPTIS T
    FIoydMcKee, pastor of Beggs, First, waits while his wife,
    finishes her yogurt.
    Pam,
    Visiting their son, Marv, in the newsroom were Margaret and
    Marvin Knox, pastor of Marlow, Gentral. Marv is moving from
    Baptist Press in Nashville to state paper editor in Kentucky.
    June 28, 1990
    106
    ll3NN.3a
    -MW -
    Ray and Wanda Christian of Norman, Bluelakes had second-level seats
    JnJhe^Superdome.-High-up,^but-not-quite7to-^nose-bleed^-level.-
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    Signing in at Home Mission Board display was Charles
    Darland, pastor of Narcissa Church and hospital
    1990
    ,
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    Theme Interpretation:
    G
    od ordained government, and its leaders are God's serv-
    ants to do good works. .
    The same G^^
    (Psa. 8:3); the prophets (Jer, 1:5), and a place for his |>eo-
    jple (I Chron, 17:9) ordained government, the "powers that
    be." This is the fundamental biblical teaching which should
    guide Christians in their understanding of, and involvement
    with, government.
    To affirm government as ordained by God is to affirm
    government as limited. God the Creator and Redeemer is
    eternal; His Kingdom is forever. In working among humans,
    God establishes and uses many temporal sejvants.
    Government and rulers are such temporal servants. In
    a limited world distorted by sin, they serve limited functions.
    Paul could say that the rulers are God's ministers to en-
    courage good. Certainly the rulers of his day did not seek
    to advance specifically 'Christian values. They presided over
    one of the most decadent eras of Western civilization. Later
    rulers became tyrants against the faithful, and the authori-
    ty that God ordained was distorted. Its dependence upon
    Him was denied.
    But during Paul's life, the power of Rome controlled
    conflict. It provided whatwas known as the Pax Romaiia
    or Roman peace. Because of the limited peace of his day,
    Paul could travel throughout the regions of the Mediterra-
    nean proclaiming the gospel. This measure of peace was cer-
    tainly a part of Paul's expectation that rulers would in part
    "do that which is good."
    The "good works" of government are not exhausted by
    the responsibility of protecting its citizens. Government and
    leaders are to promote justice and fairness (II Sam. 23:3-4;
    Amos 5:24). They, are to resolve conflict among citizens
    (Ruth 4:1 r 12). They are to protect the poor and the oppress-
    ed (Amps 5:10-15; Lev. 25-26). These expectations of
    government, rooted in the Old Testament monarchy, are cer-
    tainly among the "good works" God ordained all govern-
    1
    ment
    .•
    s
    an
    -
    d all leader
    "
    s to
    •'
    perform
    ' •'
    .
    - .
    — '
    -
    What of government today? The kingship in Israel is
    gone. The emperors of Rome are no more. We as Americans
    have a democratic heritage that provides for greater par-
    ticipation in the work of government. Even in totalitarian
    lands signs of democracy and participation are stirring.
    But the fundamental truths about government remain
    the same.
    Government is ordained of God. It exists to serve His
    purposes. God established other human institutions such as
    the home and the church. Each institution, and those who
    participate in it, has a special calling. Those callings are
    different.
    Dunn, Land Asses
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    Government is limited. God has-not given it the purpose
    of the home or the church. God's purposes are bigger than
    any government, any party. To expect top much of any
    government; to claim too much for any rulery is to deny both
    •-.::-..._•
    God'
    • :.;•
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    sovereignty.-V -:;:.;.' •; ::. ^ft'-:: :;;< -.;•;' •;' :• ''.>• :-.'-'•'• v-;-:--:/-V . >•>:
    Christian Citizenship Sunday is a day on the denomina-
    tional calendar for Southern Baptists> toaffirm this most
    fundamental truth about government and rulers: They are
    ordained of God to do His purpose among humankind.
    They hold their power, not by right, but by gift from Him.
    (This theme interpretation was written by staff members of the Southern
    Baptist Christian Life Commission.)
    'Ordained of God'
    (Romans 13:1)
    :::-:-&-S^^>:i^g^^^ S^agMcfflfflSBSSB^I?^1^^
    i
    Observe Christian Citizenship Sunday
    July 1, 1990
    The Baptist Messenger (ISSN 0744-9518), published weekly ^on Thursdays (except the first Thursday in August and
    the last Thursday in December) by the Baptist General Convention of the State of Oklahoma, 1141 N. Robinson, Oklahoma
    City, Okla. 73103. Glenn A, Brown, Editor; Bob E. Mathews, Associate Editor/Phone number: 405/236-4341. Second dlass postage paid
    at Oklahoma City, Okla. Subscription price in Every Family Church Budget Plan, 9 cents per copy. Individual subscriptions $5,00 per year.
    When writing for a change of address or a subscription renewal, please include a copy of your mailing label. The Messenger is not respon-
    sible for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or pictures and dops not guarantee their return. Circulation last week: 112,759. POSTMASTER:
    Send-address-changes-to-Baptist-Messengerr-1141"N-RoblnsonrOklahoma-CityrOkla—73
    The two agencies affected by Southern
    Baptist Convention action to defund the
    Baptist Joint Committee on Public Affairs
    anci increase support of the ChnstiairLife
    Commission hayei assessed the Miiadbh;
    In.anews conference, James Dunn, ex-
    ecutive director of the BJt, said he ex-
    pected interested Southern Baptist in-
    dividuals, churches and state conventions
    to more than "cover the loss of funding
    with direct gifts-
    Richard Land, executive director of the
    Christian Life Commission, outlined plans
    for extensive expansion of the CLC office
    in Washington, following adoption of a
    $300,000 increase to its budget.
    Land said the SBC action to add
    religious liberty and separation of church
    and state issues to his agency's program
    statement would greatly strengthen
    Southern Baptists' influence in the na-
    tion's capital.
    He discounted as unfounde'd any fear
    that the Christian Life Commission would
    send messages to Congress that would
    conflict with the voice of the BJC, which
    represents nine Baptist bodies on religious
    liberty and church state separation issues.
    Both Land and Dunn answered (ques-
    tions during press conferences following
    SBC actions which cut the budget of the
    BJC by 87 percent and increased the
    budget of the CLC by 40 percent.
    Dunn said the action would free the
    BJC to raise money from other sources,
    to reorganize its board to give more
    representation to other Baptist groups and
    to project a more sophisticated agenda.
    "It will also free us of a certain amount
    of harassment," Dunn said. He added
    that the BJC plans to continue its
    operation.
    The BJC and CLC might send conflic-
    ting messages to Congress, but "we will
    just have to live with that," Dunn said.
    The CLC, which also is assigned to han-
    dle social and moral concerns for
    Southern Baptists, will maintain its na-
    tional headquarters in Nashville but
    strengthen its operations in Washington..
    Land announced plans to add three
    members to the staff of the CLC's
    Washington
    office: the
    general
    counsel/Christian citizenship director, a
    news media director, an administrative
    assistant, plus the current director of
    government relations, Jim Smith.
    Land said about 35 percent of the agen-
    cy's $1.2 million budget would support the
    new Washington office. The CLC is
    negotiating for more office space within
    walking distance of Capitol Hill, he
    added
    >
    .
    u •
    -
    .
    .
    \.
    "My perspective," said Land, "is that
    we have a two-pronged assignment: to
    speak to Southern Baptists as the
    denomination's .prophetic conscience on
    Dunn
    Land
    moral and social issues, and to ascertain
    what Southern Baptist views are and bring
    •those Baptist convictions to bear before
    policy-making groups in Washington."
    The CLC will follow the wishes oflhe
    SBC as stated in convention-adopted
    resolutions such as those on abortion and
    prayer in public schools, Land said.
    However, he said he supports the 1962
    and 1963 Supreme Court decisions on
    prayer in public schools, and believes that
    God Destroying U.S.
    (RNS)—God has turned his back on the
    United States and is in the fifth of seven
    stages of destroying the nation, according
    to an official of the Southern Baptist Sun-
    day School Board.
    Avery Willis of the board's Discipleship
    Training department issued the warning at
    a National Prayer Conference held at New
    Orleans Seminary June 7-9 under the
    sponsorship of the board's National
    Prayer Corps and Louisiana Baptists.
    Willis, an bklalioman, is a graduate of
    Oklahoma Baptist University.
    Willis, a former missionary to In-
    donesia, said that God took his wall of
    protection away from the United States
    some time around 1963. "The war in Viet-
    nam should have been a clear signal that
    God was not protecting us'any more," he
    said. "Until then, America had been a
    victor in all wars."
    Citing a variety of statistics, Willis said
    that violent crime is up over 400 percent
    since 1963, child abuse is up 300 percent
    and federal prosecution of politicians has
    increased 470 percent.
    The Sunday School Board official said
    there are seven stages of destruction of a
    nation by God: convicting people of sins,
    warning them of siri's, applying remedial
    judgment of sins committed, withdrawing
    of God's presence, taking away the wall
    of protection, giving people over to sin,
    failure and depravity and destroying
    people. The United States is now in the
    fifth of these stages, Willis said.
    since the Supreme Court has upheld the
    equal access clause that Baptist clamor for
    public school prayer wUl decrease.
    _
    The CLC AVillSf qciis i on ^issues and not
    endorse candidates for political pff ice, he
    added; '•••• , -^^ :p'f^j-^'; -S^S.;v ^ ^ - • :
    Since the CLC opened its; Washington
    office in 1 987, it has cobperated in writing;
    at least four joint statements with the BJC
    on such issues as child car' e legislatio'
    "
    n , he "
    ' 'Before yesterday's action (by the
    SBC), we could not address the religious
    liberty and church state separation
    issues," Land said. ''Now we can y and this
    frees us to work more closely with the
    Baptist Joint Committee on joint
    statements."
    Land pointed out that, both he and
    Dunn always have been careful to point
    out they do not speak for all Southern
    Baptists, or represent Southern Baptists.
    "No one can do that," he said.
    The conflicts between the CLC and JBJC
    will be far less than most people might
    suppose, he predicted.
    The greatest threat to religious liberty
    in the last half oi^he 20th century will
    come from the violations of the "free ex-
    ercise of religion clause" in the First
    Amendment that would impinge on in-
    dividuals' right to exercise their religious
    faith freely, he said.
    The recent "Peyote case" in which the
    Supreme Court ruled against Native
    American Indians' use of peyote in
    religious rites was a "terrible travesty that
    rnust be overturned," Land noted.
    Oliver S. (Buzz) Thomas, general
    counsel for the BJC, said earlier that
    misinformation had been circulated before
    the convention oh the BJC's: position on
    the "Peyote case." He denied the BJC has
    advocated use of illegal drugs in religious
    ceremonies. He said he helped draft a peti-
    tion for a hearing to protect the free exer-
    cise of religion, but did not defend the use
    of peyote in religious rites.
    Both Dunn and Land opposed the use
    of tax money for religious schools. "There
    seem to be some folks," said Dunn, "who
    believe you can take a little tax money as
    if you could be just a little bit pregnant."
    Dunn said he plans to continue his stand
    on religious liberty and church-state
    separation just as he has in the past. "My
    commitment is to do the job God has call-
    ed me to do, and I haven't heard God call
    me elsewhere," he insisted.
    '*,•''' ,
    '
    .'*"' .
    A part of the changeover is transferr-
    ing the Washington bureau of Baptist
    Press from the BJC's offices to the new
    offices of the Christian Life Commission
    in the capital.

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    Morris' Church, Fort Worth, First, Rejoins SBC
    By Bob E. Mathews
    Messenger Associate Editor
    A former Oklahoma pastor and SBC
    past presidenty James DraperJJr., played
    arole in the! re^urrrof First Chureh,fFort
    Worthy TTexastp the Southern Baptist fold
    after 65 years as an independent church.
    The church where fundamentalist J. Frank
    Norris formerly served voted by 80-plus
    percent majority to affiliate with the
    Southern Baptist Convention June 17,
    The previous Monday, Draper in-
    troduced the Fort Worth, First pastor, Bill
    Ramsey, to the Southern Baptist Pastors'
    Conference in Newjprleans; Ramsey was
    given time to speak and told the crowd
    about meeting with his members concern-
    ing the pending action.
    "He
    told the pastors basically about his
    feeling that Southern Baptists offer the
    greatest opportunity to really make a dif-
    ference in the world and they wanted to
    be a part of that," Draper said. "He said
    'werre ready to roll-up our sleeves and go
    •t o wOrk.' "
    •-..;';•: .
    ;.;:;.-;.; .•'•.'.• '
    -.'; ; ;''•^•'••' .
    Draper said the independent Baptist had
    been working on the move back to
    Southern Baptists for two years. Ramsey
    held small group meetings with the
    members and gave time for questions as
    the move was pondered. "He came to me
    a year ago and asked me how I'd feel
    about it and how Southern Baptists might
    react," Draper explained.
    "I told him I thought it would be
    wonderful/and I do," the former pastor
    of Del City, First Southern said. f'I think
    it could be a sign of some healing and
    some reconciliation that could be very
    positive."
    \ Norris, a graduate of Baylor Univers-
    ity and Southwestern Seminary, had a fall-
    ing out with Southern Baptists over alleg-
    ed liberalism. He organized independent
    Baptist churches and was a leader in an
    organization of fundamentalist Baptist
    churches which established headquarters
    in Chicago in 1937 with 3,000 churches af-
    filiated. For 16 years, he served churches
    in Fort Worth and Detroit simultaneously.
    Norris had an eventful career as pastor
    of the Fort Worth church for 44 years
    before resigning due to failing health in
    1951. Twice, in 1939 and 1949 when the
    Southern Baptist Convention was held in
    Oklahoma City, he tried to hold "alter-
    nate" sessions and used loudspeakers out-
    side the SBC meeting to speak to the
    messengers. He died Aug. 20, 1952 in
    Jacksonville, Fla. During his Fort Worth
    pastorate, he was charged and acquitted
    on charges of murder and arson.
    Draper said that in his comments to the
    pastors Ramsey alluded to th£ fact that he
    was serving in Norris' former church and
    he (Ramsey) felt that even Norris would
    be smiling at this time.
    '
    '.
    Ramsey reported that on June 17 a lady
    stood up in the service and said she was
    present when Norris announced the
    church had beemvoted but ofthe associa-
    tionancl convention. He wept and the
    members wept, she said; Ramsey; added
    that "we wept as we left and we rejoice
    as we come back."
    Tarrant Association moderator Ronald
    Beams of Beribrpok, First said pastors in
    the area responded "very positively" to
    Ramsey and the church's decision."My
    feeling is the church will be accepted (in-
    to the association)," the moderator told
    the Texas Baptist Standard.
    The association constitution stipulates
    that the church will be investigated as to
    its desire to be a member, its agreement
    with the Baptist Faith and Message state-
    ment, its; determination to contribute
    financially to associational missions, the
    Texas and Southern Baptist conventions.
    The association's petitionary letters
    committee will contact neighboring chur-
    ches for any objections to admitting Fort
    Worth, First. The committee also usually
    Sunday
    i^^
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    NASHVILLE (BP)—A misunderstand-
    ing caused longtime Nashville pastor Bob
    Mowrey to allow his nomination for
    registration secretary of the Southern Bap-
    tist Convention at the recent annual
    meeting..''.../":":" •: '
    • - • • r-'^:^"""'"
    Mowrey, pastor of Park Avenue
    Church, told the Baptist and Reflector,
    newsjournal of the Tennessee Baptist Con-
    vention, that a friend on the SBC Ex-
    ecutive Committee had called him early ;on
    the morning of the election, June 13, and
    indicated that the incumbent registration
    secretary would not seek re-election.'
    "He asked me if I would be will'ing'to
    allow my .name to be placed in nomina-
    tion," Mowrey explained, thinking there
    would be other nominations from the
    floor.
    "It certainly wasn't a big conspiracy,"
    Mowrey said.
    Mowrey lost the election to Lee Porter;
    an editor with the Nashville-based Sunday
    School Board, by a margin of 71 -29 per-
    cent. Porter has held the post, which in-
    volves the registration process as well as
    balloting, since 1977. Traditionally, con-
    vention secretaries have been re-elected
    without opposition.
    "If I had known my friend Lee Porter
    was going to .be nominated, I probably
    would not have allowed my name to be
    considered," Mowrey added. He said he
    is committed not to ever run against
    Porter.
    He said he learned from the experience
    and would get the "facts" before allow-
    meets with the pastor and members o.f the
    petitioning church to determine whether
    or not to recommend membership.
    JairiesO; Combs^ editor of the Baptist
    BibleiTribuiiey publication of the Baptist
    Bible^ Fellowship, said he pleaded with
    Ramsey riot to make the move. The
    fellowship is successor to Norris' World
    Fundamental Missionary Fellowship.
    ••.;,' Combs said Ramsey had responded to
    c'courtship" of fundamental, conservative
    leaders in the SBC. He said Fort Worth,
    First has been only "loosely connected"
    with the Baptist Bible Fellowship.
    Combs does not predict many other in-
    dependent Baptist churches will follow
    Fort Worth, First's lead. "The conser-
    vatives in the SBC need not expect a great
    influx, and the moderates need not expect
    an invasion," he said. "We will continue
    right on as we have the last 40 years. I
    woul
    "-•,"•
    d
    .
    no
    t thin
    ^ ' ''-.''
    k
    ,
    we wil
    - "'
    l los
    *
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    .
    a
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    doze
    .
    n chur
    --.-- .
    -
    ches arid that is probably an over estimate.
    We may not lose any churches,"
    (Dan Martin of Baptist Press and Toby Druin
    of the Baptist Standard contributed to this
    story.)
    •''..'.".'.•••'.:..';'[ ''•:.'• '':"•"' .."
    '
    'Misunderstanding'
    ing his nomination in a similar situation.
    "As long as Lee is secretary, my name will
    not be given for nomination," he said.
    Mowrey said he thinks the incident was
    simply a misunderstanding and that there
    was no organized attempt to unseat Porter
    as registration secretary. "I don't believe
    I was deliberately misled,'' Mowrey said,
    laughing. He added that if it had been an
    "organized" attempt it definitely didn't
    work. Mowrey lost the election by more
    than 8,000 votes.
    In fact, Guy Sanders of Lake Wales,
    Fla., who was to nominate him, was not
    present when nominations were given.
    Presiding officer Jerry Vines called on
    Texas pastor Stan Cof fey, who was seated
    on the platform, to make the nomination.
    Cof fey also nominated Nashville pastor
    David Atchison who defeated Martin
    Bradley, longtime SBC recording
    secretary. Coffejy said he made the
    nominations because he "felt the need for
    wider participation among SBC leader-
    ship."
    Porter noted Mowrey Offered his
    apology the afternoon following the elec-
    tion. Porter verified that Mowrey said he
    was told Porter planned not to run again.
    Porter said he believed there was a
    planned effort to unseat him. "I have
    never said I was going to retire or even im-
    plied it. I'm delighted to serve Southern
    Baptists in this capacity/' he said.
    Porter emphasized he has no hard feel-
    ings about having other nominations.
    NEW ORLEANS (BP)—The centennial
    celebration of the Southern Baptist Sun-
    day School Board was launched in the
    Louisiana Superdome in a pageant which
    elicifei
    . --.'•.- .
    d nostalgi
    ' . *""^
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    -' ,
    memorie
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    . "
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    day
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    gon
    ^ ' . -
    e
    . =
    Dramatic presentations on Vacation
    .>
    Bible School , BYPU and hymns by B . B .
    McKinney all pointed messengers to look
    at their past, particularly in areas where
    the Sunday School Board has grown to
    provide leadership over the past 100 years.
    In the Wednesday morning report of the
    denomination's education and publishing
    agency, a Dixieland band led a parade of
    groups representing the past and looking
    to the future.
    Mule-drawn carriages carried actors
    representing the early day presidents of the
    SSB. Groups of employees and trustees of
    the board also marched in the parade,
    along with children on a hay-wagon pull-
    ed by a tractor.
    James L. Sullivan and Grady C.
    Cothen , the only two living ex-presidents
    of the Sunday School Board, rode in the
    parade in cars typical of when they served
    at the agency.
    Lloyd Elder, president of the board,
    told messengers he is reminded "of the
    •'work. of the SSB at every turn as he visits
    in local churches. From the hymnals to
    pew Bibles to choir music to literature in
    Sunday School classes to Home Life and
    other magazines in the lobby of the
    church, Elder said he sees many ways the
    SSB "touches the lives of Southern Bap-
    '
    Some of the memories of the denomina-
    tional giants and familiar experiences were
    presented to messengers dramatically with
    the help of The Company, a drama group
    from Southwestern Seminary. Narrator
    was Darrel Baergen, O.BU graduate, now
    on the Southwestern Seminary faculty.
    At the end of the parade which started
    the SSB report, messengers heard the
    familiar stand-up chord which has been
    used^in virtually every Vacation Bible
    School to signal the time to say the pledges
    to the American and Christian flags and
    to the Bible. Messengers then participated
    in the pledge to the Bible and were seated
    with the sit-down chord.
    Brief vignettes then introduced
    messengers to board presidents from J.M.
    Frost, who borrowed $5 ,000 from his wife
    when he first started to work , to Elder .
    Sullivan, who headed the board for 22
    years and was elected SBC president the
    year after he retired in 1975, said the
    ^
    greates
    *
    .•
    t contributio
    • . • *
    n of
    '
    the board t
    .
    o the
    SBC "will .not be found in buildings and
    size," but in commitments to producing
    Bible-based, Christ-centered f"; God-
    hbnOring publications.
    ..
    H.H. Hobbs, Oklahoma City, writer of some 1,200 Sunday School lessons, led in prayer
    during the Sunday School Board's report to the SBC. Behind him are former SSB head
    Grady^Cothen and current SSB president Lloyd Elder.
    Executive Committee Re-elects Sam Pace
    NEW ORLEANS(BP)—The Executive
    Committee of the Southern Baptist Con-
    vention re-elected its officers during an
    organizational meeting here. Sam Pace of
    Lawton will serve another term as chair-
    man.
    In other developments, the committee
    processed requests that its September
    meeting include a spiritual solemn
    assembly for its members and a discussion
    of the Washington of fice of Baptist Press,
    news service of the SBC.
    A concluding prayer session included
    prayer requested to express concern and
    love for moderates hurt by conservative
    victories at the SBC meeting in New
    Orleans and that trustees of Southwestern
    Seminary "be led by the Holy Spiriti"
    hear God's voice and do his will in their
    relationship with seminary president
    Russell Dilday.
    Other officers elected unanimously to
    second one-year terms were Paul Pressler,
    Houston appeals court judge, vice chair-
    man, and Fred Wolfe, pastor of Cottage
    Hills Church, Mobile, Ala., recording
    secretary.'
    >'"•: '
    Pressler brought up the Baptist Press
    question when he suggested that the SBC
    Christian Life Commission be asked "to
    submit to us in September the name of the
    person they would like to head the Bap-
    tist Press office in Washington."
    Dilday's relationship to Southwestern
    Seminary trustees surfaced when Don
    Taylor, a seminary trustee, asked for
    prayer to guide the trustees in how to re-.'
    spond to comments Diiday made during
    the seminary's
    .
    repor
    • '
    t
    "•
    to
    ' -
    the SBC
    * •
    .
    v
    "
    • '
    • *
    ''••" .
    Dilday, responding to a question from
    the floor, said ' 'the methodology used in
    the takeover of the convention these past
    12 years—the crass, secular, political
    methodology^does have satariic, evil
    qualities of which I am desperately
    Opposed.".': ;, • ;•:.' '( ; :.;:' •.;'.: : ':• ;:-."::--v-•.>'.'
    Taylor, a layman from Asheville, N.G;,
    characterized Dilday's remarks as
    degrading. He asked the committee to
    pray that the Southwestern trustees "will
    have stamina to do what needs to be
    done" in regard to Dilday.
    Cafe du Monde in New Orleans' French
    Quarter was the site of a victory celebra-
    tion by conservative leaders of the
    Southern Baptist Convention on Tuesday
    night after Morris Chapman defeated
    Daniel Vestal for the presidency.
    The celebration was held at the cafe
    because it was there in the 1970s that Tex-
    ans Paige Patterson and Paul Pressler for-
    mulated plans for election of conservative
    presidents and control of the SBC appoin-
    tive processes.
    -
    -
    *.''... ,
    Earlier this year, the Wall Street Jour-
    nal quoted Patterson, president of
    Criswell College, Dallas: "That (the cafe)
    was where this all started. We think they
    should put a plaque there."
    Patterson told the Texas Baptist Stan-
    dard that since a plaque couldn't be plac-
    ed in a public cafe, the celebrants award-
    ed plaques to him and Pressler to mark the
    victories over the 12 years.
    Among the celebrants was &BC
    parliamentarian Barry McCarty, a Church
    of Christ minister, who has guided
    parliamentary procedures since 1986. The
    group sang "Victory in Jesus" as a climax
    to the event.
    ...,V .
    -THB-B-APTIST-M ESSEN GER-
    ,RAGE=1=IVE

    f_. k. •-,
    ^
    (
    ^
    ^^^
    ^
    t
    WMU To Coordinate Housing For Missionaries
    Personalities
    RICHMOND, Va. (BP)—
    Housing ar-
    rangements for Southern Baptist foreign
    missionaries in the United States will be
    transferred from the Foreign Mission
    Board to the Woman's Missionary Union
    The change resulted from an arrange-
    ment between the -feoard and the WMU
    that this function was one the WMU is
    ideally positioned to handle.
    "Women of the WMUs have long been
    involved in the provision of housing, and
    often they are the ones who are responsi-
    ble for the equipping of the houses and
    receiving the missionaries upon arrival, ' '
    explaine
    . i ':..-
    d
    '
    Kisti
    - • • .
    e Patch
    . -
    . '•'
    , th
    .
    e
    f --
    board'
    •*
    s mis-
    sionary housing coordinator.
    The board has maintained a list of mis-
    sionary
    housing sponsors
    from
    throughout the SBC, Patch said. "We
    serve as. a resource to the missionaries and
    to those who wish to provide housing for
    missionaries. We work to get these two
    groups of people together," she said. In
    addition to furlough periods, housing is
    made available to missionaries during
    medical emergencies, when they have
    problems obtaining resident visas overseas
    or at other times.
    Patch makes the lists available to mis-
    sionaries, wh6%ontact sponsors directly to
    secure the housing.
    Effective Sept. 1 , Barbara Yeager at
    WMU will be the new housing coor-
    dinator. She can be contacted at WMU,
    P.O. Box 830010, Birmingham, Ala.
    35283-0010. Her phone number is
    205/991-4021.
    This responsibility will b>lend well with
    WMU's; function ;qf missi<)ns education^
    said Yeageiv " We thought it iwould be a
    perfect avenue to ftlftheirour own ministry
    here at WMU," she said.
    The Foreign Mission Board has coor-
    dinated U.S. housing for missionaries
    since the early 1970s. Earlier, Southern
    Baptist sponsors and missionaries handled
    arrangements themselves.
    Southern Baptist sponsors Offering
    housing include individuals, local
    churches, church associations and state
    1st conventions.
    Events in the Churches
    MISSION MOVE: The Spanish mission
    of Altus/Emmanuel has moved to a new
    location. Formerly sharing facilities at
    Emmanuel, the
    -
    missio
    • '* -
    n now meet
    "-"•'•
    s
    "
    in th
    -
    e
    building formerly occupied by Altus, Cen-
    tral which has disbanded. Central Church
    deeded its property to Southwest Associa-
    tion, which, in turn, deeded it to Em-
    manuel Church. The mission was started
    pos'olast
    Marcf
    Hobarth
    and
    . Campoits
    pastos r
    is
    inos Ramirw
    on tho e
    Cam-field;%
    Thursday through Sunday. Boyd
    Whitehead is pastor of the sponsoring
    church.
    ;
    ORDINATION: Tulsa, Trinity ks or-
    dained Richard Haynes and Jerry Scott as
    deacons. Phil B6(x*is pastor.
    LICENSING: Seminole, Ideal Street
    has licensed Jeff Morris to preach. Ron
    Mosley is pastor.
    NEW MISSION: International Mission
    of Tulsa, Sequoyah Hills held its first ser-
    vice June 3 with 80 in attendance. The mis-
    sion ministers to people from more than
    10 countries. Many of the people are from
    Southeast Asia. Ted Lam, a native of
    China, serves as pastor .In addition to the
    Sunday services, an international Bible
    study is held Friday evenings as an
    outreach to students at nearby Tulsa
    University. Jay Dennis is pastor of the
    sponsoring church.
    CORONATION: Seven girls were
    honored in an Acteen coronation at
    Carnegie, First. They were twins Angela
    and Andrea Heavener, queens; Stefannye
    Woodruff and Dee Ann 1 Dirickson,
    queens-with-sceptor; Shelley Wedel and
    Paula Caldwell, queens regent-in-service,
    and Laci Dyer, service aide. Linda Dyer
    is Acteen director with Jonita Blount and
    Sherri Wood as leaders.
    ChurchStaff'Changes
    PASTORAL
    T.L. Barnes has resigned at Hugo,
    Trinity and is now residing in Paris,
    Texas.
    Curtis Blackmon has resigned at
    Sasakwa, First moving to First Chinch,
    Jeffrey City, Wyb.
    Paul Clark has been called to Prague
    Church. He moves from Rexroat Church,
    Enon Association.
    Robert E. Dye has resigned at Fort
    Supply Church, Northwestern Association
    to become; chaplain at William S. Key
    Correctional Center there. He has been
    serving as interim chaplain there as a
    volunteer. -
    .Roger Duffel has resigned at Locust
    Grove, First.
    Dean George is now at Swink Church,
    Frisco Association.
    Bill Haggard has completed his interim
    . at Prague, First.
    Benny Hammons has resigned at Dar-
    win Church, Frisco Association.
    David Hardage has resigned at
    Weatherford, First moving to First
    Church, Sulphur Springs, Texas.
    Marty Harkey has been called to
    Oklahoma City, Classen Boulevard. He
    moves from Hobart, Washington Street.
    David Hill has been called to Bowlegs,
    First, his first pastorate.
    Garland Hobbs has been called to Han-
    son, First. He moves from First Church,
    Cedarvale, Ark. and has previously serv-
    ed at Hanson.
    Forrest Jackson is, serving as interim
    pastor at Locust Grove
    - !*7' •
    , First.
    '
    Bob Lever has resigned at Hanson,
    First.
    Joe Masterson has resigned at Pauls
    Valley, Trinity where he served six and
    one-half years. He is available for interim,
    supply and revivals and may b.e contacted
    at 100 S. High, Pauls Valley 73075, phone
    405/238-5002.
    A.L. Phillips has been called to Rattiest
    Churchj Frisco Association where he has*
    served previously.
    Franklin Piercey Jr. has resigned at
    Wolf
    Church,
    South
    Canadian
    Association.
    Joe L. Ray has resigned at Shawnee,
    First Indian due to health reasons.
    Verne Strahan of
    •\
    jBurkburnett
    " •-. \/ '. ' • -.. '
    ,
    .
    Texas
    is now interim pastor at Grandfield,
    Calvary.
    OTHER CHURCH STAFF
    Gary Allen has resigned as youth direc-
    tor at Duncan, Western Heights to attend
    college.
    Bob Blair is now music director at Sterl-
    ing, First.
    Billy E.Elkins Jr. has resigned as music
    and youth director at Sterling, First.
    Patrick Graham has resigned as minister
    of education and outreach at Tulsa,
    Calvary to atterid Southwestern Seminary.
    Jerry Hedrick has resigned as music
    director at Duncan, Western Heights. He
    suffered a heart attack earlier this spring.
    Debbie Kilman is summer interim for
    preschool and children at Oklahoma City,
    Spring Creek.
    Tom Wade is now minister to youth at
    Meeker, First.
    .
    PROMOTION: Molly T. Marshall-
    Green, a native of Muskogee and graduate
    of Oklahoma Baptist University, has Been
    promoted from assistant professor to
    associate professor t)f Christian theology
    at Southern Seminary^ Louisville, Ky. She
    has been a member of the faculty there
    since 1984. Marshall-Green earned her
    master of divinity and doctor of
    philosophy degrees from Southern
    Seminary;
    ORDAINED: Tom Davis, bivocational
    pastor of Cox City, First, was ordained to
    the ministry June 17 by Marlow, First
    where he has been a member since 1979.
    Davis is a teacher in Marlow schools.
    SERVING IN YIRGINIA: Deanna
    Tate, daughter of Dennis and Carolyn
    Tate of Ada, is serving
    as a Home Mission
    Board summer mis-
    sionary in Virginia
    Beach, Va. She is
    working with a team
    of full and part-time
    missionaries in beach
    ministries. Her father
    is pastor of Homer
    Church ,
    Banne r
    Association.
    ;
    CORLEY NOMINATED: Bruce Cor-
    ley, associate professor of New Testament
    at Southwestern Seminary, will be
    nominated to become dean of the
    seminary's school of theology when the
    trustees meet bet. 15-16. Corley, 47, is a
    graduate of Northeastern Oklahoma State
    University, Tahlequah and has taught at
    Southwestern since 1976. If elected, he will
    succeed William Tolar who was elected
    vicepresidpit fpr academic affairs -and
    provost last-March.
    LeGRANDE DEATH: Clifford L,
    LeGrande, 67, retired "staff member at
    '.
    Oklahom
    - ' - - - -. ' " - - '
    a
    City
    • ** ' * ~
    .
    , Olive
    .
    . ' "
    t
    , '
    die
    ' !
    d
    -'<.'-'-••''
    Jun
    e
    - '•
    12 in
    Oklahoma City; A memorial service \vas
    held at Olivet June 18. A native of Califor-
    nia, LeGrande was a graduate of Guthrie
    High School and Oklahoma Baptist
    University. He served as financial
    secretary at Olivet more than 35 years,
    retiring in 1988.
    J.C. FOWLER DIES: Funeral services
    were held May 2^ in Pauls Valley for J.C.
    Fowler, 75, retired state pastor/ Fowler
    died May 26. A native of Bowie^ Texas,
    his pastorates included churches at Dun-
    can, Cyril, Tonkawa, Sapulpa and Wyn-
    newood. He was also a school teacher.
    Survivbrs include a son, Robert, Sapulpa;
    a daughter,. Carla McCann, Copperas
    Cove, Texas; eight grandchildren and one
    great-grandchild.
    JACK HALL DIES: Jack Hall, 72,
    retired state pastor, died June 22 in
    Oklahoma City .He was a resident at the
    Oklahoma City Baptist Retirement
    Center. A memorial service was held at
    Oklahoma City, Knob-Hill June 23. A
    native of McLoud, he was licensed to
    preach and ordained to the ministry at
    Westlawn Mission, Oklahoma City.
    Oklahoma pastorates included churches at
    Williams and Crowder. He also served in
    Kansas and Arizona. Survivor
    -i
    s include
    four sons, Jack Jr., Earlsborp; Phillip,
    Gilmei\ Texas; Joe D., Phoenix, Ariz; and
    karkin; Germany^ two
    Kathleen Swart^ Oklahoma City ^arid
    Grace Hamilton^ Phoenix; 24 grand-
    children, 15 great-grandchildren and ^
    great, great-grandchild. His wife
    two daughters preceded him in death.
    Moore, First, one-day revival, June 10, five addi-
    tions by baptism, seven by letter and one for full-time
    service; evangelist, Dalton Young, Norman; singer,
    Rod Salmon; pastor, Bobby Boyles.
    Calera, First will hold its centennial celebration July
    1. Four former pastors, Raul \yheelus- Rick Ver-
    million, Eugene Morrison and Loftis Nunley, will take
    part in the event. Lunch will be served at the church.
    A 2 p.m. service is planned with five musical groups
    performing. No evening service. Jacob Toews is
    pastorMoore
    .
    ,
    •'
    Firs.'•.);•t
    -
    wil-,-.;l
    celebrat•'
    .; . ;';..
    e
    ;;r.it,
    s
    :
    100t
    ,
    ;-;
    h
    ' .-•.'.."anniversar• -"v. ';
    y
    July"!.' ; -/;;;•:•.,;•;."; ; ;'. -' •-:;./ - -. ; - - -."' ',
    Baptist Student Union of Central State University
    will hold a reunion from 4 to 8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 4 at
    the BSU. Occasion \yill also mark CSU's 100th an-
    niversary. Gall 405/341-1232 for reservations for a
    6 p.m. meal. Information on former BSUers and their
    addresses may be sent to Box 1480, Edmond.
    73083-1480,
    Available and Wanted
    These items are; published without charge or en-
    dorsement. Items will not be repeated weekly. Right
    to edit or reject is reserved. Send information, in-
    cluding name, address and phone, to Box 25816,
    Oklahoma City 73125.
    PREACHER: Aaron Hacker, retired state pastor,
    is"available for supply, interim and revivals. Contact
    him at 101 Allenhurst, Oklahoma City 73114, phone
    405/752-1628. - .
    -
    BUS: For sale: 1969 Ford 28-passenger F600 bus,
    $1,500. Contact James Stuart, pastor, Unjon Hill
    Church, Box 7, Ada 74820, phone 405/436-5673.
    COORDINATOR: Reva Archer is available as
    ^enior adult coordinator in Tulsa area. Contact Ar-
    cher at 14532 S. Maple PL, Glenpool 74033, phone
    918/322-3525.
    PORTABLE BUILDINGS: For sale: two portable
    buildings, 12-by-40. Each has two classrooms, heat,
    air and porches. Contact Britt Lesley, pastor, Bever-
    ly Hills Church, 400 S.E. 59th, Oklahoma City 73129,
    phone 405/634-0065 or 634-8565.
    PREACHER: Doug Miller will be available for
    supply, interim and revivals this fall. Contact him at
    501 W. Caddo, Wilburton 74578, phone
    918/465-2128, 653-7965 or 885-2226.
    PIANO TUNING: Jimmy Don Miller will be
    available to tune pianos *at Falls Creek June 27-29.
    Contact him at 405/243-3504, Elk City.
    .
    ORGAN: For sale: Thomas organ, $800. Contact
    Pat Spoelstra, 727 Pine Oak, Edmon-d 73034, phone
    405/348-1705.
    .
    PREACHER: George Kidd, former state pastor, ,
    semi-retired, is available for supply, interim and
    revivals. Contact him at 14690 N.E. 50th, Choctaw
    73020, phone 405/390-2534.
    LAY EVANGELIST: Thomas Beadles, lawyer and
    member of Oklahoma City, Mayfair, is available for
    week-end revivals in smaller churches. Contact him
    at 100 Hightdwer Bldg., Oklahoma City 73102, phone
    405/232-6490 or 521-0029.
    COUNSELOR: Ron J. Miller, trained in family
    and individual therapy, is available for pastoral
    counseling. He is member of Duncan, Highland Park.
    Miller may be contacted at 1307 Hickory, Duncan
    73633, phone 405/255-0559..
    VAN:
    For sale: 1975 Dodge 14-passenger van. Con-
    tact Cox City Church, Rush Springs 73082, phone
    405/658-6402.
    VAN: For sale: 1983 Dodge 15-passenger yan, dual
    air. Contact Lowell McGougan, 813-B S. Sunnylane,
    Moore 73160, phone 405/392-2096 or 799-3868.
    BIBLE CLUB MATERIALS: Needed is material
    for Backyard Bible Club on mission trip to Kansas.
    Contact Darrell Haley, minister of youth and music,
    Edmond, Emmanuel Southern, 700 W. Second, Ed-
    mond 73034, phone 405/341-6984,
    CUSTODIAN: Oklahoma City, Baptist Temple
    seeks full-time custodian. Inquire in person for ap-
    plication form at 2433 N.W. 30th, Oklahoma City.
    MUSIC: Cache, First seeks music minister. Send
    resume to Box 437, Cache 73527.
    YOUTH/MUSIC: New Hope Church near
    Tecumseh seeks part-time youth or music/youth direc-
    tor. Contact Jerry Tdckett, pastor, Rt. 2, Tecumseh
    74873, phone 405/598-6430.
    v
    PC JR. PRINTER: Needed is an IBM PC Jr.
    parallel printer and transformer. Contact L. Hen-
    dricks, 1104 Juno Circle, Edmond 73034, phone
    405/340-1847.
    YOUTH AND EDUCATION: Norman, Alameda
    seeks part-time youth minister and part-time educa-
    tion minister. Send resume to 1503 E. Alameda, Nor-
    man 73071.
    '
    AIR CONDITIONER: Small church needs 110-volt
    air conditioner as donation. Contact V.O. Danger-
    field, Greater Galilee Church, 625 Terrace Lawn,
    Oklahoma City 73129.
    CHRISTMAS MUSIC: Idabel, Trinity wants to
    borrow 25 books and accompaniment tape for "Make
    His Praise Glorious'* by Deborah Harris and Mary,
    Haynes, Word Music, 1988. Contact Barry Raper,
    Trinity Church, Idabel 74745, phone 405/286-7710
    or 286-2926.
    ORGANIST: Sapulpa, South Heights seeks part-
    time organist. Contact the church at Box 630, Sapulpa
    74067 or Terry Horn at 918/581-3315.
    • '.'•'- .
    '
    •"
    '•
    ..."•-.
    PREACHER: Franklin L. Piercey, Jr. state pastor
    for 20+ years is available for supply, full or bi-
    vocational pastorate. Write 102 East Franklin,
    Shawnee, OK 74801 or call Monday-Thursday
    405-273-6072 days.
    •RAGE-SIX-

    I
    ?
    ALONG THE WAY
    BY BILL TANNER
    EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR-TREASURER
    he of the most
    powerfuitaf gu-
    ments for Christianity in the days of Jesus'
    disciples were the miracles of healing. On
    this occasion the man they had healed
    stoo
    t
    d
    -
    with them
    1 .[t, ,,_ .^^.^ju—
    .
    He
    •— - ,-!..-
    didn'
    . f.- - " -
    t
    r
    sa
    .
    y
    of
    anything
    .-
    ^r ,
    ^^^
    ,
    J
    but even in his silence they had to deal with
    a miracle and with Christ.
    Notice, first of all, an undeniable fact.
    "Saying, what shall we do to these men?
    for that indeed a notable miracle hath been
    done by them is manifest to all them that
    dwell in Jerusalem; and we cannot deny
    it" (Acts 4:16). A visible, viable fact is
    very difficult to deny. They are stubborn
    and the finest argument from the brightest
    scholar cannot turn them aside. Theories
    cannot oyercome^the evidence of fact.
    Fact
    ' . • " . - "
    s
    , •,
    la
    -,'
    y
    *^ ! '
    th
    i -
    e
    ^ • c
    Burde
    -.-,'-" -" • " •
    n
    -
    o
    '"*',"*
    f
    »
    proo
    - -*
    , -
    f
    - ". ,
    on
    ,'-
    th
    - '
    e
    critics. No(argument is necessary to prove
    facts, they simply stand there in their ma-
    jesty and truth challenging every assailant
    saying,••'-' 'Explain to me before you go fur-
    ther. •' The presence of the man who had
    been healed was one of those wall-like
    obstacles stancling before the critics. Had
    they been able to get rid of Him they might
    have won, but they couldn't.
    The facts of Christianity are the hope
    of its progress: the ordinances, the
    miracles, most of all the Son of God
    himself- His life, death, burial and resur-
    rection. These are facts. And these facts
    are strong enough to change the world.
    Of'Non
    Given On Service By
    ' Church On
    Much discussion at the New Orleans
    SBC meeting was generated when it was
    revealed that the chairman of the
    nominating committee was pastor of a
    church which was considered "non-
    cooperating" for lack of Cooperative Pro-
    gram contributions.
    In the final session on June 14, further
    explanation was given On circumstances
    involving Roland Lopez, pastor of Em-
    manuel Church, Me Allen, Texas.
    Bill Sutton, pastor of First Church,
    Me Allen, came to Lopez's defense. He
    said he feared the convention had been
    "insensitive" to the problems of an ethnic
    church. Sutton explained that Lopez had
    been called to the church last November,
    a month and a half after the church's
    Uniform Church Letter had been due.
    McAllen, Emmanuel filed no UCL and
    gave nothing to the Cooperative Program
    in 1989. SBC parliamentarian Barry
    McCarty advised president Jerry Vines
    that Lopez's service as nominating com-
    mittee chairman was still valid because at
    the time of his election the church he serv-
    ed was cooperating with the SBC,
    Sutton said Lopez served the McAllen
    church without salary for four months and
    the church had given an "advance gift"
    of $300 to the Cooperative Program, but
    it was not given in "the correct church
    year;"
    Sutton observed that the UCL is an
    "Anglo-English document" and said
    Lopez and the church "did not meet our
    expectations" in dealing with it.
    ''.•
    Sutton wanted a gesture from the
    messengers to show the. Hispanic con-
    gregation the SBC did not view it as an
    PAGE EIGHT
    ••:
    .
    ;
    Outcast." Vines said it would be done
    even though no quorum was present to ap-
    prove the action.
    Falls Creek News Roundup
    Falls Creek Assemby director
    Harry K; Dodd gives following in-
    formation qn the upcoming five
    weeks of assembly:
    —Insurance coverage included
    in the registration fee provides no
    coverage for off-grounds activities.
    The insurance covers campers
    enroute to and from the assembly
    and while on the grounds. Trips to
    area recreation and entertainment
    facilities are hot covered.
    —New rules for recreation: No
    adult players allowed on boys or
    girls softball and volleyball teams.
    (An adult is a person one year past
    high school graduation.) All softball
    teams will play two games each.
    Losers will play losers with no ad-
    vancement to winners bracket.
    —Still needed are male
    lifeguards.
    —Still needed is one doctor for
    first, second, fourth and fifth
    weeks.
    —CABINS: Dodd's office
    maintains a list of available cabins.
    Cabin rentals will be handled
    through
    his
    office.
    Cabin
    availabilities will NOT be listed in
    the Available and Wanted column.
    Notice, in the second respect, an
    unanswerable testimony. "And beholding
    the man which was healed standing with
    them, they could say nothing against it"
    (Acts 4:14). It may well be that the silent
    presence of the man who had been healed
    had almost as much effect as the
    arguments of Peter, the logic of John and
    the theory of James, pie strongest proof
    of the resurrectioni of Jesus (Christ was
    Jesus Christ himself walking among His
    people. There was no need for speaking
    and "no argument was necessary. And, in
    this instance, the unanswerable argument
    for the power of Jesus to heal was the
    presence of the man who had been heal-
    ed. One illustration, one fact, is worth
    10,000 words and maybe one experience
    is worth more than a ton of theology.
    We know today that the richest heritage
    of the church is that army of souls, each
    of whom has a story to tell that has been
    reborn in Jesus Christ. Addicts who are
    clean, immoral people who are pure,
    dishonest men who now cling to that
    which is right—these changed lives have
    to be jaccourited for or disproved by an
    unbelieving world, and the simple fact is,
    the
    ',
    y
    "^
    cannot
    -
    -
    .
    .
    . • . a
    - .
    -•-.• •
    Finally, notice he was an unwavering
    witness. "And beholding the man which
    was healed standing with them' '(Acts
    4:14a). This man did some preaching, but
    not wit
    "
    h words
    .
    .
    "
    Th
    e Scriptur
    '
    *^
    e say
    • ^
    s
    '
    "he
    -•':'
    stood with them." I think it is possible he
    could have begged off and said, "I'm very
    timid," "I'm embarrassed," "People
    won't believe me anyway," and simply
    walked away. Many^of our peope;are like
    this. They enjoy all the blessings and gifts
    of the new birth experience, but they are
    not willing to stand as a witness. I say
    without any hesitancy their absence not
    only hurts the Son of God but it also hurts
    His cause.
    We read that this man had enthusiasm
    for Christ. He was shouting, praising
    God—why shouldn't he? He had enough
    to make him enthusiastic. Satan will take
    a new convert who is enthusiastic, happy
    and turned on for Christ and try to cool
    him down. I think one of the things that
    bothers the Evil One most is that some
    time, at some point in our commitment we
    may become foolish for Christ in our zeal.
    We. can get enthusiastic about everything
    under the sun. What's wrong with being
    enthusiastic and happy about the ex-
    perience of grace in our lives, the strength
    of Christ day by day to our lives and the
    hope of heaven, eternally with Him for
    our lives!
    Schedule
    June 28— 9:00 a.m.—Budget Sub-Committee
    10:00 a.m.—Administrative Committee
    ;- ;3:00 p;m.—OSU Chair of Bible Conference
    June 29-r-Staff Performance Reviews
    _ - :
    June 30—First Church, Stririgtown
    July 2—Staff Performance Reviews ,
    :
    JulyS—Staff Performance Reviews
    July 4—Holiday
    .
    .
    .
    Letter
    .
    s from Readers
    i
    'If You Can't Lick'em, Jbin'em'
    This old adage Is now good advice for
    Baptist moderates who have just suffered
    their 12th defeat in trying to dislodge the
    conservatives from control of the
    Southern Baptist Convention. Perhaps if
    they keep flighting they eventually will
    regain control, but meanwhile they are
    severely weakening the church and are
    sowing discord that will linger for many
    years. They are also running a tremendous
    risk of breaking the church apart.
    I am a moderate, and for the last five
    years have tried in a small way to support
    that cause. I am still angry that the
    Pressler-Patterson team has, by its own
    admission, conspired and maneuvered to
    gain control of our great convention. But
    I have also begun to realize that most
    Southern Baptists are following their
    pastors in accepting the ideas of the
    fundamentalists.
    My great-grandfather was killed in the
    Civil War, a senseless war that never
    shoulcl have been fought. If cool-headed
    leaders on both sides had been more pa-
    tient in negotiating their differences, the
    slaves might have been freed in a few years
    allowing the South to adjust its economy
    without bloodshed. But like the Baptist
    conservatives and moderates, they chose
    to go to war.
    I believe it is time for the moderates to
    stop fighting, infliter the ranks of the rul-
    ing part and try to influence its decisions.
    In .other words, let' s determine to make
    the best of a bad deal. Otherwise, I am
    afraid my grandchildren may be asked:
    'Which one of the SBC's do you belong
    to?"—V^W. CROUCH, member,
    Bartlesville, First
    Give Us Back Our Vision
    The reports of the recent Southern Bap-
    tist Convention are both discouraging and
    disgusting. The churches deserved better
    representation than they got.
    I Started going to conventions 53 years
    agoY and the first one I remember had the
    theme from Joel 2:28 "Your old men shall
    dream dreams and your young men shall
    see visions."
    Southern Baptists, up to this year, have
    had great missions and visions of great
    things. This year they fulfilled an old say-
    ing "When a small man casts a shadow
    the sun is about to set." The reports we
    get from the SBC this year show the nar-
    row visions of small men. With the world
    facing Armageddon, and plunging
    headlong into hell, we spend our time
    diilying' dallying petty things.
    We have seen visions of a world won for
    Christ, a Cooperative Program that would
    make us more effective, Baptist principles
    and doctrine be emphasized, of a world
    healed after World War II. and a revival
    spirit to spread across this land of ours.
    Instead we get reports of a divided and
    •-.-.
    disunite
    - --••-',• - -.
    d
    • -'•_•,
    convention
    . -.
    , v . . - .
    ,
    * --•'-•,'...-'
    with
    . .
    nothin
    - - •-
    t?
    g
    _ .•
    but
    criticism for each other, and reports of
    friction that made us all very sad;
    ~~~:l hope in the coming year we will pray
    that the Lord will give us back our vision
    of greatness and world mission leader-
    ship.—FLOYD RALEY, member,
    Oklahoma City; Quail Springs
    Where Did They Go?
    Where were the majority of messengers
    to the Southern Baptist Convention on the
    final day of the meeting?, Were they sent
    as messengers just to elect a president, b'r"
    to consider all of the, program and
    business at hand?
    Practically all of the messengers had
    their expenses paid by their home
    churches. What kind of a report can be
    made if they did not attend?
    Is it fair to accept church money for ex-
    penses and not attend full time? Should
    the church be expected to pay for a vaca-
    tion for those few who make the trip to
    the convention?
    When more than 38,000 people register
    and less than 5,000 show up for the last
    day of business, it is time to ask for an ac-
    counting from the messengers. I am a con-
    servative Southern Baptist and have no
    objection to the election of Morris Chap-
    man as president. I am questioning the
    abesenteeism
    of
    some
    of
    the
    messengers.—GEORGE W. STONE,
    member, Stratford, First
    Last Straw
    In my opinion, Russell Dilday drew the
    last straw with his remarks in New
    Orleans. To say that much of what has
    been behind the conservative movement is
    satanic is going too far.
    Dilday doesn't realize that those words
    were not just an attack against a few, but
    against the majority of Southern Baptists.
    The bottom line is that the majority of
    messengers put the conservative leadership
    in and has said it wants a conservative
    president and a conservative convention.
    Dilday is out of line with the majority.
    He doesn't have to agree with everything
    our conservative leadership stands for, but
    somewhere a line must be drawn. I think
    Opinions expressed in these letters are those of
    the writers and do not necessarily reflect the opi-
    nion of the editorial staff of this publication. Let-
    ters submitted should be 200 words or less. All
    letters may be edited for length. Names may be
    withheld if requested. No form letters or unsign-
    ed letters will be printed.
    he has stepped over it. It is time for
    Southwestern Seminary to have a presi-
    dent whose heart beats like a true Southern
    Baptist.—JIM CUNNINGHAM, pastor,
    Hilldale Church near Claremore
    Read Falls Creek Rules
    An open letter,to all churches attending
    Falls Creek:v
    ;•;;'-'';'f-f-.'•".'^/&.^ -:": :>'V-
    Dear Pastor, Camp Director and
    Sponsor,
    :': v.-:^;,;..'v>;_:-:':;--;;:;•;••• ••;;•;.,-;:;
    Please go over the Falls Creek rules with
    your campers before leaving for Falls
    .
    Creek
    - - T .
    '
    l
    "- .
    Th
    *
    e
    "'
    Fall
    ' '
    s
    '
    Cree
    '
    ^
    k
    '•
    rule
    •"-.",-
    s
    '
    are
    '----,.
    not
    - J
    just
    merely suggestions, but rules that are easi-
    ly understood by anyone who reads them.
    In the last several years some of these rules
    have been stretched beyond their limits
    and broken by not only the campers but
    by some adult leaders as well. By break-
    ing the rules this causes a "stumbling
    block" to those who are trying to keep
    .them.,/ ;.''•':,.^..';' ' ;. ; :,., , .•';:: '•':•.••'' . •;•'.;'•>,.:.•.'
    Harry Dodd and his entire crew are to
    be commended for their hard work in
    keeping the grounds of Falls Creek arid
    seeing that the Falls Creek rules are kept.
    You can help them by determining to keep
    all the rules before you even leave your
    church parking lot. Remember, if you in-
    tend to break the rules before leaving for
    camp, don't expect the campers to obey
    the rules while you're at camp.—Name
    withheld by editor
    Shelby Medical Update
    Joyce Shelby, education director at
    Oklahoma City, Capitol Hill, who was
    severely injured in an April 28 bicycle ac-
    cident, now faces yet another surgery. She
    suffered a multi-fractured skiill and a
    dangerous tear in a major blood vessel in
    the brain. The July 5 operation will be to
    renew normal nerve signals to the facial
    area and repair an ear drum. The expenses
    will be major.
    Capitol Hill Church has established a
    medical expense fund to help on "out-of-
    pocket" expenses. Gifts to this cause
    should be made out to Capitol Hill Bap-
    tist Church with the designation "Joyce
    Shelby Medical Expense Fund'' to make
    the donation tax deductible.
    The church expresses its thanks for all
    the prayers and gifts in her behalf .—JIM
    WHITE, pastor, Oklahoma City, Capitol
    Hill
    \\
    PAP AMP MOM ARE OUT
    RIGHT Novl— BUT I'LL
    bfc 6LAP TO tolMlSTfiR TO YOU/'/
    '
    -THE^BAPT-IS-T-MESSENGER-
    dbNE-2871-990-
    BAGEJSJINE

    [fct-.--.v-
    4-6-:"
    6
    1
    7-11
    7-11
    13 :V:
    15
    19
    20
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    27
    30
    31
    1-2
    1
    2
    3
    4-7
    7-8
    9
    10-16
    10
    .1.1-14
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    25-27
    1-2
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    2
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    8-9
    8
    10-17
    10
    12-13
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    17-24
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    24
    29-30
    31-April 7
    March 31
    April 7
    6
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    12-14
    12
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    16
    20
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    26-27
    28
    -
    30
    1
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    4
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    12
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    20-22
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    25
    29-31
    31-June 1
    31-June 1
    2-3
    2
    3-7
    3-7
    3-7
    4-6
    -7-8-
    ^V^-U-^7:^
    "State BSU Directors Conference^ E^
    -•: Make;Your Will Sunday ^
    ;
    ;V
    "- Bibhr Study Wee^
    r^-.1 V-;--,::--"'::-"-.^- ^V U"'v-"--.-'•-
    ;' Baptist Building, VStaff Planning Days"
    i
    ! ;
    ;, r: ;"
    Soul-Winning Commitment Day; ^
    State Baptist Doctrine Clinic !
    -
    Area Keyboard Hymn Playing Festivals -
    ; ;
    V
    Sanctity of Human Life Sunday
    , :
    :
    ; State Evangelism Conference; Del City, First Southern
    "**'
    Baptist Men's Day
    ;
    •'".:'-
    Student ^Missions Interviews, Weatherford, Southwestern, BSU
    Student Missions Interviews, Shawnee/OBU, BSU
    ,
    .
    FEBRUARY
    ,
    Stale;Youth Choir Festival #1
    Student Missions Interviews, Tulsa University, BSU .
    BSU Promotion Team Auditions, Midwest City, Rose State, BSU
    Baptist World Alliance Sunday
    ,
    •\ National CWT Seminar, Moore, First :
    Student Missions Selections, Baptist Building
    .
    State Keyboard Hymn Playing Festival, OBU
    Focus on WMU
    Race Relations Sunday
    State Planning Meeting for Directors of Associational Missions, Falls Creek
    Families Reaching Families Clinic
    ;
    . State Hispanic WMU Conference, Oklahoma City, Exchange Avenue
    Home Mission Study—1991
    Baptist Seminaries, Colleges and Schools Day
    OBU Day in the Churches
    ;
    State Training Session for Associational VBS Teams, Muskogee, First
    . Slate Youth Choir Festival »2
    State Training Session for Associational VBS Teams, Oklahoma City, Putnam
    /City
    _ •, •-/•;':' -!
    "•'•'-,.
    _. ;
    -'- .
    ;
    '.-••'.."•... •;
    .
    '•
    ' Volunteers in Missions Day
    Counseling Depressed and Suicidal Persons
    "•'.',.
    . ",".;- ".-,-
    -: :
    MARCH
    "
    '
    :
    '
    ;
    •;./ :
    , \-
    .;
    State RA Congress, Tulsa, Skelly Drive
    Growth 2000 Conference, Tulsa
    OBU Preview Day
    ;
    Week of Prayer for Home Missions and Annie Armstrong Easter Offering
    State High School BYM Conference
    State Acteens Conference, OBU
    ..
    Indian Evangelism Conference, Moore, First
    State Planning Meeting for Promotion of Mother's Day Offering,, Edmond,
    -Boys Ranch Town
    Youth Week
    v
    '
    ""' • ;
    Home M.issipns Day in Sunday School
    .
    State Jointly,,Employed Missionaries Workshop, Falls Creek '.'•'- .
    State BSD Basketball Tournament, Stillwater, OSU
    Associational Baptist Youth Night
    Suggested Spring Revival Dates (South)
    Hispanic Evangelism Conference, Oklahoma City, Exchange Avenue .
    Start-a-Church Commitment Day
    BSU Student Missions Workshop, Midwest City, First
    Suggested Spring Revival.Dates (North)
    APRIL
    Suggested Spring Revival Dates (North)
    State Handbell Festival
    State Senior Adult Singin* and Praisin' Meeting
    ASSISTeam and ACTeam Training and Sunday School Program-Promotion
    Meeting, Henryetta, First
    ,
    BSU Spring Retreat* Falls Creek
    ,
    ASSISTeam and ACTeam Training and Sunday School Program-Promotion
    , Meeting, Oklahoma City, Southern Hills
    Baptist Doctrine Study
    State New Pastors/Staff Fellowship-Orientation Meeting, Oklahoma City
    State Young Musicians Festival, OBU
    Cooperative Program Day
    '
    SALT Meeting, Oklahoma City
    Life Commitment Day
    .
    Mission Opportunities Awareness Conference, Madill
    '
    .
    :
    -MAY
    ' ' . .-"; '
    ,
    .
    .
    .
    vvMission Opportunities Awareness Conference, McAlester
    Mission Opportunities Awareness Conference, Tahlequah
    State BSU Directors Conference
    State Campers on Mission Rally, Norman, Clear Bay
    Mission Opportunities Awareness Conference, Grove
    State Children/Youth Bible Drill and Youth Speakers Tournament, Oklahoma
    City, First :
    .
    .
    .
    .
    '
    Christian Home Week
    Senior Adult Day
    Family Care Ministries Emphasis Week
    State Bjble Conference, Falls Creek
    Mother's Day Offering for Family Care Ministries
    Ministers of Education Programming Retreat, Falls Creek
    Volunteers in Missions Workshop, Oklahoma City
    Baptist Radio and Television Sunday
    Associational Emphasis Week
    Senior Adult Spectacular, Falls Creek
    State Church Building Conference
    State WMU Council Meeting, Oklahoma City, Baptist Building
    OBU Commencement
    Summer Missionaries Orientation, OBU
    State Lad/Dad Camp, Camp Hudgens
    Mothers/Daughters GA Camp #I, Nunny Cha-ha
    , ;
    "
    '
    _
    ' ' *
    JUNE
    ,
    '
    '
    "
    . ..
    WMU Annual Meeting
    Religious Liberty Sunday
    • RA Camp, Camp Hudgens
    GA/Acteens Camp, Nunny Cha-ha
    , ,
    Hispanic Assembly,, Falls Creek
    '
    Southern Baptist Convention, Atlanta, Georgia
    I
    *
    10-14
    10-14
    17-21
    17-21
    17-19
    21-22
    21-22
    23; ,
    24-28
    24-28
    26-28
    30
    R A Camp, Garfip
    .. .
    GA:/Acteens;Carripf Nunny Cha-ha
    !
    --TcxaV:-Wcekl«:-ipalls;^
    Mothers/Dauighters GA Camp *3, Nunny Charha
    RA;Carrip; Camp;Hudgens
    ; ; -
    y
    :--
    GA//Vcteens|Camp,:Nunny Cha-ha
    ,
    :
    Jndiari^Falls -Creek. :;;-^/r^:;^^'^:;^
    State Church Medja .Library Conference, OBU
    Lad and Dad Camp, Camp Hudgens
    .
    Mothers/Daughters GA Camp #4, Nunny Cha-ha
    Annuity Board Sunday
    r>:
    v
    :
    RA;Camp,yCamp Hudgens
    ^
    ,
    GA/Acteens Campj Nunny Cha-ha
    State Literacy Missions Workshop, OBU
    Christian Citizenship Sunday
    8-12
    8-12
    8-12
    15-19
    15-19
    15-19
    22-26
    ;
    26-27
    29-August 2
    29-August 1
    4
    5-9
    11
    12-14
    12-13
    14-17
    15-17
    15-16
    18-25
    25
    26-28
    28-30
    30-31
    .1-7
    '-'
    3,-
    ' •
    4
    5
    6-7
    6
    6
    8-11
    8, '
    10
    13-14
    13-14
    .
    16
    17
    .
    18
    19
    20
    23-24
    24
    27-28
    29-Oct.6
    1
    3-5
    8
    10
    11-12
    11-12
    11-12
    13
    24
    28
    28
    29
    29
    30
    31
    31
    1-2
    1-2
    1
    2
    .
    3-9
    4
    4
    ...
    8-9
    10
    :-
    11-13
    .11-12
    11-12
    12
    17-20
    J18
    19
    21
    25
    1-8
    3-4
    6
    8 ,..•
    JO-3L.
    .
    .
    .
    --
    RA Camp, Camp Hudgens :"•-•. - "- :
    Camp Nunny pha-ha Staff Work Week
    -v
    /
    ^
    Falls Creek, First Assembly
    RA Camp, Camp Hudgens
    GA/Acteens Camp, Nunny Cha-ha ,,
    Falls Creek, Second Assembly
    -
    RA Camp, Camp Hudgens
    GA/Acteens Camp, Nunny Cha-ha
    Falls Creek, Third Assembly ..",-, -
    State Children's Weekday Education Workshop, OBU
    Falls Creek, Fourth Assembly
    Senior Adult Conference, OBU
    ;•";.'"-
    ': ;-I.-:.;";vv .-AUGUS T
    ' -
    • :,
    . =;-": "
    • "•-.•/-. '
    Day of Prayer for World Peace
    7 '
    Falls Qreeki FifthvAssembly
    Language Missions Day
    KBA Bible Conference
    •/
    ..-.' .
    ' ';
    State Music Methods and Materials Clinic
    State Chinese Falls Creek Encampment
    Oklahoma WMU Conference, OBU
    State Music Methods and Materials Clinic
    Church Music Emphasis Week
    Birthday/Anniversary Catch-up Sunday for Family Care Ministries
    Oklahoma Conference on Youth Ministry
    State Planning Meeting for Directors of Associational Missions, Falls Creek
    BSU Leadership Training Conference
    ,
    SEPTEMBER
    "
    •••
    ".--••
    . --
    -.--••
    \-
    •-
    -.
    '
    •. -
    ..
    ,
    .
    •••• ?•
    Brotherhood Leadership Week
    WMU Area Training, Edmond, First, 7-9 p.rri.
    WMU Area Training, Edmond, First, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
    WMU Area Training, Enid, Calvary, 10 a.m. -2 p.m.
    State Part-time/Volunteer Song Leaders-Accompanists Retreat, Falls Creek
    WMU Area Training, Guymon, First, 10 a.m,-2 p.m.
    Christian Parenting: Breakthrough to^ New Lifestyle
    Season of Prayer for State Missions and Edna McMillan Offering
    Single Adult Day
    Associational Sunday School Leadership Night
    Sunday School Leadership Seminar, Falls Creek
    State Campers on Mission Rally, Norman, Clear Bay
    WMU Area Training, Weatherford, First- 7-9 p.m.
    WMU Area Training, Weatherford, First, 10 a.m. -2 p.m.
    '•;. -
    WMU Area Training, Lawton, First, 10 a.m. -2 p.m.
    WMU Area Training, McAlester, First, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
    WMU Area Training, Tulsa, Ranch Acres, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 7-9 p.m.
    Glorieta in North Central Oklahoma
    "Reactivating the Small Church" Conference, Clinton, First
    State Chaplains Retreat, Falls Creek
    Sunday School Preparation Week
    OCTOBER
    State New Pastors/Staff Fellowship-Orientation Meeting, Oklahoma City
    State Indian Leadership Conference, Cherokee Assembly Grounds
    State Sunday School Growth Spiral Conference
    State WMU Council Meeting, Oklahoma City, Baptist Building ?
    State Baptist Men's Retreat, Falls Creek
    State BSU Black Retreat, Oklahoma City
    '
    State Hispanic Leadership Conference, Oklahoma City, First
    World Hunger Day
    Equipping Conference for Pastors of Plateauing-Declinfng Churches, Oklahoma
    "City ;
    ,
    .. . ..
    ;'.". • .'; ' .
    :" '
    '_.'• '
    -
    :
    Area Discipleship Training Workshop "
    Oklahoma Baptist Regional Tax Seminar
    Area Discipleship Training Workshop
    Oklahoma Baptist Regional Tax Seminar
    Oklahoma Baptist Regional Tax Seminar
    Equipping Conference for Ministering to Alcohol/Drug Abusers and Families,
    -OBU
    Oklahoma Baptist Regional Tax Seminar
    NOVEMBER
    BSU International Student Conference, Midwest City, Rose State
    Oklahoma Christian Arts Festival
    Oklahoma Baptist Regional Tax Seminar
    OBU Preview Day
    Royal Ambassador Week
    RA Conclaves"
    Baptist Women's Day of Prayer
    OBU Homecoming
    American Bible Society Day
    .
    Annual Session, Baptist General Convention
    State WMU Annual Session
    Pastors Conference
    State Chaplains Meeting
    Foreign Jvlission Study— 1991
    *
    Conducting Children's Bible Drill, Guymon
    Conducting Children's Bible Drill, Pryor
    Conducting Children's Bible Drill, Burns Flat. . . .
    Associational Church.Training **M" Night *
    .
    '
    "
    • '
    ;
    .
    DECEMBER
    Week of Prayer for .Foreign Missions and Lottie Moon Christmas Offering
    Annuity Services Conference for Directors of Associational Missions/Falls
    Creek
    .
    "•'•• •
    .
    Jointly Employed Missionaries Christmas Banquet.
    JEtoreign-Missions-Day-in-iSunday-Sohool
    man
    r^;g^^;^.--:v;":':-::.;.
    83M&$w$
    ?V-V
    •V'vi
    •--':?'.i'••'••.'.
    '. ^'}f.:._ t
    £f:
    Chris Tecmire, pastor of Ridgecrest
    Church near Blanch a rd, and his wife, Bar-
    bara, stopped by a cookie shop enroute to
    the sessions. Tecmire served on the SBC
    Committee oh Order of Business and
    spent most of the convention on the
    platform.
    i.'-
    Pete Martin (center) portrayed the apostle John in a pastors* conference drama based
    on Psalm 119. Other Del City, First Southern cast members were (from left) Sam Sim-
    mons as Moses, Steve Roberts as Paul, Ralph Speas as David and C.J. Hill as Abraham.
    Among Oklahomans at a Home Mission Board church-start banquet were (from
    left) Bo Holland of Tulsa, Gerald Dyer, Northeastern Association director of
    missions, and his wife, Barbara. The banquet celebrated the starting of 1,306
    churches in the SBC in 1989.
    Bill Merrell (right), pastor of Midwest City,
    Country Estates, visits with saxophonist Vernard
    Johnson on the closing day of the SBC. Merrell
    was a member of the Resolutions Committee
    which put in as many as 14 hours a day work-
    ing on resolutions, but due to lack of a quorum
    on the final day, only two of the committee's
    proposed statements were voted on by the
    messengers.

    <
    v,
    *
    iS*
    -*-V.
    Vt*
    % *
    CAMP HUDGENS REUNION—The 3Qtli anniversary of the beginning of Camp
    Huilgens for Royal Ambassadors was observed June 19; Five men who took part in
    the first week of the camp attended the bbservance. They were (from
    McDow of Norman, Northeast and Neil Hopkins of Oklahoma City, Quail Springs
    who attended as boys; John Henson of Brush Hill Church near Checotah and Jack
    Seymour of Midwest City, Meadowood, first week counselors, and Bob Banks, now
    Home Mission Board executive vice president, first camp director. Below, Joe Dee
    Ray (left) and Paul McCullough take part in the anniversary event. Ray was pastor
    of MeAlester, First when a member, Mrs. Zettie Edith Hudgens, gave the money to
    start the camp. McCullough now directs the camp. Ray was camp pastor last week
    and Banks was camp missionary. In its 30 years of operation, Camp Hudgens has pro-
    vided 208 weeks of camping with a total of 26,393 campers. Professions of faith have
    totaled 1,697 with another 1,697 surrendering to special service. Missions offerings
    total $17,999.52. (Photos by James Warren)
    Adult Care Program
    Director Named
    William M
    *
    . "Bill" Pierce
    *
    , minister of
    education and outreach, Sapulpa, First
    since 1985, has been named Adult Care
    Program Director for
    Family Care; Minis-.
    triesy according to
    Sam L. Garner, ex-
    ecutive director. His
    responsibilities will in-
    clude directing the
    program ministries of
    three retirement cen-
    ters and four Baptist
    villages operated by
    the Baptist General Convention of
    Oklahoma.
    Pierce is a graduate of Northeastern
    Oklahoma State University, Tahlequah,
    arid Southwestern Seminary in Fort
    Worth, Texas. Having majored in eco-
    nomics and business administration he
    is licensed by the state of Oklahoma as
    a nursing home administrator. He has
    served on the administrative committees
    of the Baptist Retirement Center of Hugo,
    and the Baptist Retirement Center of
    Owasso. He is a member of the National
    Association of Church Administrators
    and the Southern Baptist Religious Educa-
    tion Association. He is currently a
    member of The Baptist Foundation of
    Oklahoma Board of Directors.
    "Bill Pierce is extremely qualifed for
    this position. He brings a wealth of exper-
    tise to the adult care ministry of our
    agency," Garner said.
    Pierce an
    . .
    d
    '
    his wife
    r
    .
    ,
    *
    Susan,
    * .
    have two
    children, Chad, age 10 and Cassie, age 8;
    Grace Helps Father, Son Replace Revenge With Love
    Clergy Invitational
    GOLF TOURNAMENT
    August 6-7 (54 holes) Flights, Trophies, Food,
    Prizes—Hole in One (New Olds) :
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    Contact Don Dendy, Minister of Education
    Park Cities Baptist Church
    P.O. Box 12068, Dallas, TX 75225
    (214) 369-8211
    See the Great Passion Play & Stay at
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    „,,
    By Craig Bird
    Foreign Mission^Board Writer
    JOHANNESBUROrSouth Africa (BP)
    —Hating white people—to the point of
    wanting to kill them-came naturally to
    Gideon Makhanya arid his his son J,:
    Their firsthand encounters with the
    economic unfairness of apartheid in South
    Africa, and the brute force sustaining that
    policy of racial segregation, spawned a
    desire for revenge.
    But today, although still steadfastly op-
    posing apartheid, they love those they
    once longed to murder .That, they agree,
    is an act of God's grace.
    "In 1976, when my son was 4 years old,
    he told me to bring him home a little white
    boy 'just like me,' ''Makhany a
    remembered. "When I asked why, he
    looked up at me and said, 'So I can kill
    him.' "
    v : -
    : '^;:V::,v;:;j;\;;.v •;•;./
    Makhanya, a second-generation Baptist
    pastor and former-executive secretary of
    the Baptist Convention of Southern
    Africa, was disturbed but not surprised by
    his son's attitude.
    "First, he had recently seen white
    soldiers shoot black children during a stu-
    dent protest, and his hatred grew out of
    that experience," Makhanya explained.
    "And second, I felt the same way when
    I was a boy.
    "My father was a Baptist pastor who
    loved the Lord arid worked hard, but all
    the money collected in his churches went
    into a central fund. He was paid four
    pounds a month, even though government
    figures said a family the size of ours
    needed 100 pounds a month to ensure ade-
    quate nutrition.
    "My five brothers and three sisters
    turned away from the faith because of the
    way the white mission administrators kept
    us so poor. I developed a real hatred and
    thought all whites should be killed, but I
    kept going to church.
    "Then, when I was 13, I heard a white
    missionary preach an Easter sermon on
    John 3:16. I realized I was a sinner and
    gave my heart to the Lord. But something
    happened I didn't expect: much to my sur-
    prise, from |hat time on I found I enjoyed
    loving and accepting whites."
    Makhanya has participated in the Bap-
    tist Convention of Southern Africa—
    made up primarily of black churches—
    which was admitted to membership in the
    Baptist World Alliance in 1988. He was
    convention executive secretary from 1984
    t
    ..
    o
    ••
    1988
    • •
    .
    .
    '
    ...:.-»4;,.
    .
    " Currently he works. for the Pretoria
    Council /of Churches and is part of
    ''Standing for ...the Truth,1" a non-violent
    civil disobedience campaign to desegregate
    public transportation in Pretoria, He was
    one of three blacks arrested last August
    for trying to board a bus reserved for
    whites.
    "
    After his young son expressed his desire
    to kill white children, Makhanya brought
    children of some of his white friends home
    so his son could see that not all whites are
    Hike the soldiers who had so horrified him;
    "By God's grace he worked out his bit-
    terness and now attends a multiracial
    school," Makhanya said. ^
    But the depth of that grace was not
    really tested until 1988.
    In July of that year Makhanya attend-
    ed the Baptist World Alliance general
    council in the Bahamas. On his returny the
    government seized his passport. "It's nor-
    mal for the government to assume any
    black organization that becomes indepen-
    dent is politically motivated," he said.
    Previously all Baptist churches wer6 af-
    filiated with the predominantly white Bap-
    tist Union of South Africa.
    The passport seizure "nieant I couldn't
    accept the chance to go to the United
    States to study-at;the North American
    Baptist Theological Seminary (in Sioux
    Falls, S.D.), plus 'visits' from the police,
    which had begun the previous December,
    came more often," Makhanya explained.
    "One night in October 1988, we woke
    up at 3 a.m. to find three van-loads of
    police stomping on our roof and coming
    in the door. That time they didn't come
    to look through my books; that time they
    came to intimidate. It was like they ex-
    pected to find a terrorist under every
    bed:"
    ; ::-:--^ '•.'•- : ./•:.', . "V
    Makhanya's son, now 15, opened his
    eyes to find the barrel of a machine gun
    six inches from his face. Makhanya was
    herded into a van, barefooted/ and told
    to show the police where a friend of his
    lived. At the friend's house the police
    repeated their search.
    "My family had no idea if I would come
    back or not," Makhanya said. "They
    weren't told anything." But at 4:30 a.m.,
    with a handshake and thanks from the
    security chief "for your cooperation," he
    was returned unharmed.
    "I really felt like I was losing my faith
    that next day," he admitted. "Then when
    it was time for our family altar that night,
    I didn't even want to open the Bible. I was
    so low and really questioning God."
    But the family went ahead, studying
    Romans 8:28: "... for all things work
    together for the good to those who love
    the Lord and are called according to his
    purpose."
    "I couldn't take any more," Makhanya
    said. He wondered aloud: "What good
    could possibly, come out of what happened
    .to us last night? And out of all the other
    experiences we've had here?"
    His son, who 1.0 years before had;
    wante
    *
    d to
    i
    murde
    . .
    r
    *
    white children,
    f
    'answered the despairing father. Makhanya
    recounted the answer, a touch of wonder
    in his voice.
    "I know something very good that came
    from this," the^bby said. ^At school other
    boys/ask me^hat happens; when police
    raid our home. Today I could tell them
    Avhat happened, arid it gave J me oppor-
    tunities to witness about the love arid pro-
    tection of God."
    v
    Makhanya gathered the pieces of his
    faith, his confidence in God restored."If
    .my son can see God's love in the barrel
    of a machine gun," he said, ''then I can
    learn from him."
    In Mongolia
    BATOR, Mongolia (BP)—
    Mongolian educators have expressed in-
    terest in student exchanges ^between
    Southern Baptist colleges and universities
    and the Mongolian State University.
    The exchange possibility was discussed
    during a recent meeting in Ulan Bator,
    Mongolia's capital, by Mongolian univer-
    sity officials and Jack Shelby of
    Cooperative Services International; the
    Southern Baptist aid organization.
    "This was the very first thing the peo-
    ple at the university mentioned/" Shelby
    said. "They're hungry for this kind of ex-
    change. That's where I look for our next
    big thrust to develop if we can find Bap-
    tist schools interested in providing scholar-
    ships, and I believe we can."
    Cboperative Services International has
    sjponsbred several teams of Southern Bap-
    tist teachers who have taught English in
    Mongolia, trained Mongolians in English
    teaching and worked with the government
    to design English instruction for primary
    and secondary schools. The government
    is promoting English education in a drive
    to expand economic ties with Western
    nations.
    Mongolia, a once-isolated nation of 2.5
    million people wedged between the Soviet
    Union and China, has joined the ranks of
    communist states opening up to the West.
    Street demonstrations Tor democracy were
    going on daily while Shelby was there, he
    said.
    "The atmosphere now is much more
    open, much freer and much more pro-
    gressive than it was three years ago," he
    observed. "It's almost like beingin a dif-
    ferent country."
    -
    .
    One high government education official
    told Shelby: "We must move ahead with
    the opening to the West.The policy of our
    government is to improve relations with
    non-socialist countries, and I'm commit-
    ted to carrying it out."
    B-APTISr M ESS EN GER-
    PAGE-THIR-TEEW

    Jr
    Trinity
    Chouteau, First
    Claremore,
    Eastern Hills
    First
    Cleveland, First
    /Westpbrt
    Clinton, First.-
    Bessie Mis.
    Spanish Mi.s
    Coalgate, First
    Colbert, First
    174
    519
    i 17.
    182
    125
    135
    82
    16
    159
    130
    782
    272
    57
    40
    188
    25
    197
    67
    117
    15
    137
    53
    223
    312
    211"
    50
    97
    162
    118
    113
    187
    30
    134
    96
    129
    28
    168
    241
    1281
    54
    18
    163
    72
    109
    - 150
    159
    91
    82
    292
    161
    135
    172
    33
    438
    87
    140
    97
    587
    203
    173
    420
    .29
    • 1Q3
    91
    197
    17
    79
    15
    219
    41
    .24
    56
    76
    34
    82
    52
    34- 7:
    63 -
    42 3
    12 —
    2 -
    59 -
    Attendance
    Reports
    Sunday, June 17, 1990
    If the report of your church does
    not appear here, please send it each
    Monday morning. To be sure, it
    reaches our office by Wednesday;
    please send it to our post office box.
    Mail each Monday morning to Bap-
    tist Messenger, Box 25816, Oklahoma
    City, QK>73125. Be sure to include the
    zip codei
    :
    CHURCH
    SS DT ADD
    Achille, Community ; 35
    28 '-•—.
    Ada, First
    . 670
    9
    Morris Memorial 171 39
    Oak Avenue
    121
    48
    -—
    . Union Hill
    ,
    60 —
    -
    Adair, First
    97
    Alex, Southern
    45
    Alfalfa
    -V
    64
    Altus, Emmanuel
    157
    Spanish Mis.
    35.
    First
    .898
    Southside
    129
    Alva, First
    166
    Amber, First
    ,8 0
    Anadarko, Bethel
    162
    Spanish Mis.
    35
    First
    221
    •Apache, First
    ,
    168
    Ardmore,
    Emmanuel
    First
    Mary Niblack
    . Northwest
    Southwest
    Arkoma, First
    Arnett, First
    .
    ,
    Atwood, First -
    Barnsdall,. First
    Bartlesville,
    Eastern Hgts.
    First
    Highland Park
    New Harmony
    Oak Park
    Southern
    Trinity
    Virginia Ave.
    Westside.So.
    Beaver, First
    Mexican Mis.
    Beggs, First
    Bennington, First
    Bethany, First
    Bixby, Riverview
    ^Blacicwell, First
    Nursing Home
    Immanuel
    Blair, First
    Blanchard, First
    Midway Southern
    Ridgecrest .
    Blocker
    Boise City, First
    Bokchito, Faith
    Bosweli, First
    Bowden, First
    Bristow, First
    Broken Arrow,
    Clearview
    First
    Brush Hill
    Burbank, First
    Bums Flat, First
    Butler, First
    Caddo; First
    Calera, First
    Chandler, First
    Southern
    Chattanooga, First
    Checotah, First
    Cherokee, First
    Cheyenne, First
    Chickasha,
    College Hts.
    Spanish
    First
    24
    1
    13
    96 -
    34
    37
    61
    105
    2313
    0
    9
    —--
    47
    5
    14
    —.
    ,4— 0
    -7
    34
    ^-
    17
    51' -
    19
    1
    :3
    22
    43
    16
    60
    29
    100
    73
    62
    39
    24
    58 -
    54
    123
    -
    353
    6
    --
    42
    — . .. 5
    43
    42
    114
    63
    Cole, First ,
    CoIIinsville,
    'Tri-Co. Mis.
    Copan, First
    Coweta, Emmanuel
    Southern
    ' First
    Cowlington, First
    Crescent/First
    Cromwell, First
    Cumberland;
    /
    Gushing, First
    Park Place .
    Cyril, First ;' ' •
    Davenport,, First,
    Da vis, First
    .
    Turner. Falls ':•]
    Chapel-
    Delaware, First
    Del City,
    First Southern
    Dewar, First
    Dewey, First
    Drumright, First
    Duke, First
    Duncan,-First
    Highland Park
    Immanuel
    Liberty
    Durant, Calvary
    Fairview
    First .
    Earlsboro, Fairview
    First ,
    Eastman
    Edmpnd, ^
    Henderson Hills
    Waterloo Road
    Hispanic Ch.
    Elgin, First
    Elk City, First
    Elmore City, First
    Enid, Calvary
    Good News M.
    Emmanuel
    Erick, First
    Erin Springs
    Eufaula, First
    Lindsey Chapel
    North Fork
    Fairland, First
    Fairview, First
    Fittstown, First
    Fitzhugh, First
    Fletcher, First
    Fort Cobb, First
    Fort Supply
    Gage, First
    Garber, First
    Gatlin
    Gene Autry, First
    Gotebo, First
    Greenfield, First -
    Grove, First
    Guthrie,
    ;
    Calvary Hill
    First Southern
    Seward Road
    Guymon, First
    Hammon, First
    Harrah, First
    Hartshorne, First
    Haskell, First
    Incl. Extension
    Haywood, First
    Healdton, First
    Henryetta,.
    Immanuel
    Hickory
    Hinton, First
    Hobart, First
    Spanish Mis.
    Holdenville,
    Penn West
    Hollis, First
    Hooker, First
    Howe, First
    -'**-
    Hughes
    Hugo, First
    Oak Grove
    Southside
    Incl. Extension
    Idabely, Immanuel
    Indiahoma, First
    Jnola, Calvary
    First
    Kellyville, First
    Keota, First
    Kildare, First
    Krebs
    .
    Langley, First
    ;Laverne, First
    Lawton,
    Cache Road
    Cameron
    First
    54
    25
    I
    34
    94
    62
    238
    39
    144
    67
    20
    279
    78
    122
    110
    200
    232
    2 --
    12
    -
    34
    22
    17
    30
    29
    60
    46
    14
    53 . 17
    2212 201
    117
    3.8
    135
    29
    145
    27
    ,114.
    44
    685
    613%
    6
    15-5
    52
    25
    250
    25
    241
    55
    551
    104
    154
    79
    52
    63
    946
    208
    30
    188
    601
    22
    19
    4
    5
    13
    693
    132
    122
    137
    117 ,
    128
    133 ,
    102
    55 :
    55
    229
    122
    42
    71
    83
    122
    32
    70
    92
    257
    96
    337
    49.
    374
    77
    486
    109
    133
    164
    73
    152
    66
    23
    151
    395
    24
    .36
    327
    131
    "• 53
    33
    191
    98
    39
    54
    27
    71
    59
    261
    94
    58
    22
    51
    - 34
    73
    134
    913
    '851
    30
    40
    53
    74'
    71
    339
    105
    8
    1.
    11
    1
    2
    1
    4
    — 1
    23 2
    38 2
    2
    67 1
    51 -
    52 -
    43 —
    24 -
    59 1
    41 —
    6 —
    50 -
    8 —
    58 -
    26 -
    28 7
    78 2
    40 1
    - 1
    70 —
    38- -
    90 2
    48 —
    40
    22
    25
    9
    44
    14
    —^
    415
    7
    —-
    7
    14
    20
    38
    85
    37
    21
    25
    Incl. Korean
    Mission
    1031 —
    • First West
    351
    58
    Immanuel
    65
    26
    • Mission Village
    35
    31
    • Trinity
    208
    78
    Leach, First
    86—
    Leedey, First
    165
    42
    Lindsay, First
    269
    70
    Lorie Grove, First
    126
    15
    Loving>:
    v^^MSvv '-— ,•
    Mangum, First
    237
    33
    Manriford, First
    206
    55
    Lakeside
    141
    Marietta, First
    226
    60
    Marlow, Central
    135
    33
    First
    '40 3 ;3 4
    Marsden
    41
    23'
    Maysville, First
    '177'- 69
    McAlester,
    Bugtussle
    28
    First
    .-•• . 405
    22
    Frink
    121
    21
    High Hill
    Victory Park'
    McLoud,
    Emmanuel
    First- .,
    Ernmaus Indian
    74, 26
    261
    69
    104
    147
    54
    27 ;—
    1
    i1
    4
    1555 - 10
    408 102
    310
    58
    170
    52
    250
    96
    66
    15
    391
    62
    224
    72
    171
    57
    Mission
    Mead,
    - Streetman Road
    28
    Meeker,
    ,
    Morning Star .
    92
    23
    Miami, Northwest
    145
    23
    Midwest City,
    Country Estates
    488
    FirsMeadowoot
    d
    V 43
    66
    1
    2
    49
    Westminster Road 58
    37
    Milbunv First
    54 ,—
    Moore, First
    Calvary Chinese
    Mission
    ,
    41
    Regency Park
    245
    36
    .Morris, First
    301 100
    Mounds, First
    87. 17
    Mountain View,
    First
    ;
    ,145
    34
    Muldrow, Victory
    36
    20
    Muskogee,
    Boston Ave.
    95
    38
    Central
    109
    36
    . Hispanic
    25
    —.
    Eastern Heights
    215
    First
    803
    Oldham Memorial
    228 129
    Mustang,
    Chisholm Hts.
    First
    Newalla, First
    Newcastle, First
    Newkirk, First
    Nicoma Park, First
    Ninnekah, First
    Norman, Alameda
    Bellevue
    Bethel
    First
    Immanuel
    Norwood-Lakeview
    Oak Grove
    Missionary
    Okeene, First
    Okemah, First
    Oklahoma City,
    Britton
    Brookwood
    , Capitol Hill
    Cherokee Hills
    Crestwood .
    Criitcho
    Exchange Ave.
    Grand'Blvd.
    Highland Hills
    Kentucky Ave.
    Knob Hill
    Mayridge
    Memorial
    Olivet
    Plainview
    Portland Ave.
    Putnam City
    Quail Springs
    Rancho Village
    Shields Blvd.
    Southern Hills
    Trinity
    Valley Brook
    Village
    West Lawn
    Wilmont Place
    Qkmulgee, Second
    Nuyaka Mis.
    Oktaha
    Olustee, First
    Only Way
    .
    54
    351
    1171
    200
    207
    57
    "19862 -
    '--
    "192
    274
    40
    220
    87
    438 .78
    392 108
    153
    19
    22
    8
    444 121
    57
    37
    189
    70
    20
    11
    8
    3
    5
    -
    0
    39
    28
    300
    68
    37
    19
    343
    1452
    693118
    -
    161
    842
    355
    44
    21
    671
    116
    39341 '
    —-
    148
    74
    »3441
    7
    8
    J--4
    26
    26
    175
    47
    41
    64
    21
    -
    1
    8
    2
    3
    4
    2
    Orion, First -
    Paden, First
    Paradise Valley -
    Park" Hill
    Nursing Home
    Pauls Valley, First
    Incl. Mission
    Pawhuska, First
    Pawnee, First
    Perkins, First
    Perry, First
    ;
    Picher, First
    Pocasset, First
    Ponca City,
    vNortheast
    Sunset
    Crestview Mis.
    Poteau, First
    Immanuel
    Prague, First
    Pryor, First
    Southeast
    Purcell, First
    Extension
    Union Hill
    Ralston, First
    Rest Home
    Ramona, Firs't
    '
    Ratliff City, Firs.t
    Red Oak
    ,~
    Ringling, First
    Roff, First
    ;Rolling Hills, First
    Roosevelt, First
    Sallisaw, Eastside
    Cans Mis.
    Hispanic Mis.
    Sand Spfings,
    Calvary
    Sapulpa, First
    Incl. Mission
    South Hts.
    Westside
    Sayre, First
    Seminole, First
    Trinity
    Sentinel, First
    Shattuck, First
    Shawnee,
    Immanuel
    Rock Creek
    University
    Shidler, First
    Skiatook, First
    Immanuel
    -Snyder, First
    Sperry, First
    Stigler, First
    Stilwell, Calvary
    Southern
    Spanish Mis.
    Stratford, First
    Sulphur, First
    Swan Lake
    : Tecumseh, First
    Thomas, First
    Timber Hill
    Tonkawa, First
    Incl. Mission
    Tulsa, Belview
    Berryhill
    Brookside
    First
    34
    85
    102
    118
    17
    211
    243
    170
    275
    190
    240
    75:
    186
    161
    40
    212
    194
    213
    575
    ; 42
    180
    70
    192
    87
    11
    116
    78
    46
    66
    43
    92
    96
    116
    34
    27
    93
    515
    544
    131
    65
    184
    443
    86
    165
    63
    8
    36
    40
    40
    21
    41
    26
    45
    45
    58
    67
    88
    39
    16
    57
    89
    .33
    53
    54* M 6
    171
    223
    30
    17
    167
    39
    224 119
    129
    27
    199
    66
    129
    39
    83 -
    100 34
    230 58
    41
    243
    107
    23
    49
    34
    21
    14
    12158
    0
    --
    104
    42
    117
    46
    121
    ' —
    1232
    129
    45
    -
    51
    1
    60
    1
    35 . . —
    45
    23
    210
    6 —
    ,—
    228
    0
    -3
    1
    4
    1
    1
    4
    1
    1
    Garnett Road
    224
    46
    3
    Glenwood
    220
    Keystone Hills
    Mission
    48
    Golden Hills
    71
    29
    Gracemont
    608
    Hispanic Mis.
    22
    Indian Mis.
    26
    — ' —
    Immanuel
    327
    44 *—
    .
    Hispanic Mis.
    58
    —•
    V Lynn Lane
    125
    65
    : Nogales AVe. ; ,217 : 49 ; —
    .First Indian
    ;
    - :
    Mission ,..
    .' 22
    Oakridge
    :
    48'-.': 12 —;
    Olivet
    :
    ,533 137
    2
    Parkview
    -24j \ -^
    1
    Ranch Acres
    216
    "West Side Ext. 29
    Nursing Home
    42—
    Red Fork
    331
    —V
    1
    Riverside*
    143
    2$
    2
    Sequoyah Hills
    627
    161
    — „
    Skelly Drive
    368
    1
    South Tulsa
    556
    6
    Southwood
    305
    98
    Suncrest
    92
    : Trinity
    199
    3
    Valley View
    89
    27
    Woodland Acres 390
    90 —
    Freedom Mis.
    11 6
    Tupelo, First
    91
    45
    2
    Tushka •
    143
    37
    Vinita, Dupree
    16
    10
    First '
    ...
    295; / 37
    .-
    Vivian
    35
    Wagoner,
    Immanuel
    81
    31
    Walters, First
    186
    38
    Wanette, First
    123
    52
    2
    Wann,,First
    66 22 —
    Wapanucka, First
    55
    — : —
    Watonga,-First
    125
    28 :.—
    Waynoka, First
    63
    16
    —:
    Weatherford,
    Emmanuel
    201
    48
    4
    First
    - 358
    184
    1
    Webbers Falls, First 96
    33 .—
    Westville,.First
    144 . 53
    V/etumka, First
    166
    12
    : Yeager Mis.
    25
    — , —
    Whitefield
    96
    57
    Wilburton, Calvary
    81
    35
    First
    158
    59
    Willis
    89
    50
    Wister, First
    62
    Extension
    18
    • —
    Woodward,
    '
    Crown Hts.
    34
    17
    4
    First
    408
    1
    Lincoln Ave.
    .94
    46 : —
    Wynnewood, First
    209
    Yale, First .;
    121. 27 -.—
    Yukon,
    Canadian Valley
    96
    37
    Zaneis
    102
    63
    OCRA Plans Petition Moderate Leader Resigns Pastorate
    LANGUAGE CHURCHES:
    Moore,
    Indian Mis.
    Tishomirigo,
    First Indian
    Tulsa, Hmong
    19
    17
    vvTt4E VISION TARRIES,
    vgMlUt 5UNPAV MORNING
    APPROACRETH". ''
    TO OUR
    PASTOR
    34 - -
    23
    •P-AGE-F0URT-EEN-
    T-H E-BAP-TIST-M ESS EN G E R-
    For Vote On Abortion
    An interdenominational organization
    formed to seek a new law prohibiting
    abortions iri^ Oklahoma : will launch an
    .
    initiativ
    '•
    L. ' . '< .
    e
    ..•
    • '
    petitio
    *...' .
    n
    .. ,*..,',.•-
    nex
    .
    t
    '• '•-,.'-.
    week
    . .:.•:- -
    .
    "" ;-;.-•
    Th
    .
    e
    Oklahoma (Coalition to Restrict Abortion
    (OCRA) is headed i?y Fred W. Sellers 'Jr. . ',
    a former lay
    '
    staff member at Norman,
    Sellers said OCRA will be a tax-exempt
    corporation and it is drafting a statute to
    prphibit abortion. His group will seek
    enough valid signatures on a petition call-
    ing for a vote on the November ballot.
    Sellers said the initiative petition will be
    filed with the Oklahoma secretary of state
    at 9 a.m. on Fri., June 29. "We hope : to
    gather some 1 20,000 signatures on our
    petition by July 9," he said;
    OCRA's goal is a law to prohibit abor-
    tio
    .
    n
    • .
    and
    ,...,..*.•,-.
    impose
    -
    sever
    . .. '
    e crimina
    - : , .
    l penaltie
    'X. i
    s
    in all but the following cases: 1 .when the
    physical health of the mother is seriously
    j eopardized ; 2 . a certifiable case of rape or
    incest, and 3. when the" fetus is very
    seriously defective.
    * * MINI-BUSES *
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    (RNS)—William L. Self, an active par-
    ticipant in the moderate movement in the
    Southern Baptist Convention during the
    past; decade, surprised his congregation at
    Atiahta'svWieiica Roa<i Church^ when he
    announce
    1 <i,
    ,- .•.••.-••••,•.'-
    d hi
    ' •'••.•••.'•."••
    s resignatio
    • •:•:••• '•'• -:.'• •.;-
    n
    . '':•:•
    a
    :
    s
    •-'•
    pasto
    • > ••.':'."'
    r
    Jun
    .-.••,•-.--..
    e
    .
    17.
    -v :,;•:;; y;/ -..-. /:j;: -;.- ;:.; : ,;.-v:--/...:,;;,;:.
    > ;:.
    ,;;..,:• ,
    Speaking just days after the denomina-
    tion's annual convention in New Orleans,
    where moderates failed to elect their
    presidential candidate for the 12th con-
    secutive year, Self said,'-The events of the
    past few months have been stressful to me
    and my family, and on the advice of two
    physicians, we are resigning."
    The 58-year-old minister said his
    resignation will take effect Aug. 12, when
    he will complete-26 years as pastor. He did
    not disclose his future plans.
    In 1977, when Self was president of the
    Foreign Mission Board, he delivereid the
    annual convention sermon at the
    denomination's national meeting in Kan-
    sas Gity, At that time, he said Southern
    Baptists have the ability to meet the needs
    of the nation because they "have been
    sheltered from the ravages of theological
    liberalism that, like locusts, has eaten the
    heart out of other communions."
    But in ensuing years, Self found himself
    opposing the efforts of conservatives to
    rout what they described as efforts of
    liberals to take control of the denomina-
    tion. In 1985, he denounced what he
    A & A Upholstery
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    .„..„.
    Rtr-i; Box 247, Eureka SpringiSi Arkansas 72632
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    - ^ ••••'"• • '''^^-
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    Check with us for special events throughout the year.
    described as "the Babylonian captivity of
    the Southern Baptist Convention."
    Ike,Reighard, president of the Georgia
    Baptist Convention^ said he ^vas '•,'• shpck-
    edv'.b
    •' '-' "'" ' "-".'"'
    y
    •-•'
    Self'
    " " '-- '..- , '=
    s
    « ^ '-'- ",..*"
    rissignatiori
    - - • ^^- " ','"-• -' •' '.'.-.:' "."'
    :
    : '"
    -H
    " - ' »
    e
    - '•-• : •
    has
    ' •
    ^
    '
    bee
    ..-
    n
    a^ leader'in the^moderatempveineht, and
    aithpugh we may^ not share^theological
    persuasibns; he has been the type of man
    I have admired and appreciated through
    the years,'- Reighard said.
    Victims of fires and tornadoes in
    Oklahoma have been given cash assistance
    through the BGCO's disaster relief ;..furids.; J
    Three families, members of Stillwater,
    First, shared $ 1,100 after their homes were
    damaged by a May 18 tornado. The
    allocations are based on amount of
    damage and'insurance coverage.
    In v the Hinton area, seven families
    shared in distribution of $2,050 after a
    May 19 tornado struck their homes. The
    money was delivered by F'hil Brehm of
    Hinton, First and Ken McCloud of Scott
    Church. Both serve on Caddo Associa-
    tion's disaster relief committee.
    Blackgum Church in East Central
    Association was given $2,500 in aid after
    fire destroyed-its facilities May 27. The
    assistance included equal amounts from
    BGCO funds and Home Mission Board
    money.
    BGCO disaster relief aid funds come
    from the Edna McMillan State Missions
    Offering and is administered by the state
    Brotherhood department.
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    •dUNE-28—1-990-

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